Cornell Small Farms: High Tensile Fencing

Cornell Small Farms: High Tensile Fencing



hello I am rich Staver grazing specialist with Cornell Cooperative Extension of Chenango County New York and this film will be on high-tensile electric fences setting posts and corners or braces corners and braces use similar construction and we have some contributions from Rob to clue and Troy Bishop regardless of the kind of livestock you have whether it's dairy cattle beef sheep or any kind of livestock it is extremely critical that you take care of details that being the setting of the posts and building strong corners here we have some excellent examples of a three weight corner well built here's an example of another corner with some gates and here's an example of a corner under construction and we're going to end up with a relatively poor example of a corner that's what you don't want building high tensile fences is very time-consuming and expensive so we need to do it correctly right from the beginning in our planning considerations we have to keep in mind that we might be bringing machinery into these fields later on so layout is a completely different topic but it does it is worth mentioning it's also worth mentioning that in our modern fencing systems we need large diameter posts up to five inches and they've got to go at least three and a half feet in the ground and you're not gonna be able to achieve the results you need using hand tools and counting all these posts by hand one of the best ways to pound these posts is to gain access to one of these hydraulic fence post pounders which are very expensive but several agencies may have them for rent or fencing contractors typically have them now here we will watch Troy Bishop on the NAP farm in Cortland County of New York operating the post pounder there are a number safety precautions you should follow when using one of these machines such as wearing eye protection ear protection and keeping animals and children away from this operation as you can see there's some tremendous weights of Steel here and a lot of hydraulic pressure and those are all potential safety hazards now as Troy nears the end of the sequence of pounding this post into the ground you can see that this force is going to be in the ground for a long time and this is a much more viable way to pound post than it is by doing it by hand so geometry says that if you can get this post in three and a half to four feet down and you can get this post in three to four feet down that from here to here eight feet or 10 feet you can put the rail in and you can put six strands of high-tensile on this kind of a system you can read in all the manuals if you go to TS c if you go to NRCS this is a standard spec it's it's good it really is there's a video everything it's all good the thing I want you to leave with today is this geometry gets a little messed up if what ends if you put the post this post at the top because that how many friends have you seen where they do that does that does that mess with the geometry it does on a brace system great how about this Mester the geometry a little it's better than the top right how about this so after today all I want you to remember is on an 8 foot brace system or a 10 foot brace system or 12 foot brace system generally this hole will be 40 inches in my entire 20 years of guns building it's always been to 40 inches or give or take 40 to 38 and that's the geometry says that that's where it ought to be for it to put six strands of high-tensile on say why is he drilling a hole what's what's all that about well you got to hold the rail up many people use you can use a bowl right well what happens to a bolt that's not galvanized and rough right and when it rusts and it's inside this post what does it do it falls down it rocks great so you need just as good a components as your 30-year wire that's why you use these they're a little more expensive but you should buy them you put them in you put the wire you put that on you um you all you hold that what are you gonna do okay so if the post is if you pop if you drill a hole 40 inches should you draw a ball of 40 inches here in this segment Troy makes sure that Paul and Maureen at the owners of this multi-species farm have gotten the crosspiece level you're off kilter what someone's right someone's wrong someone's in the middle right that rarely is the same because you have a different way of looking at the landscape how it fits in whether it should be a little higher or lower and the only one that really matters is calling Maureen because they got a look at it for the next 30 years whatever looks good right as long as it fits into the environment you can you could get a better perspective over there maybe all right let's touch tree no it isn't geometry but if in the end it flows with environment we got we get very linear we're human we get linear looking oh if it's 40 there it's gotta be 40 here yep and then you cite that one end now he's going to twist it hi and now Troy will show us how to use his electric drill in a special bit in drilling the posts for the galvanized pins which will brace the corner okay so you set the post you've build them you put the big brace wire on here now we got to build a brace it's important to note at this point that Troy leaves about an inch of that brace pin sticking out of the fence post and that's where the tension wires will be attached yo handle no rat like wire cutters there is a bulk you can buy or you can get from NRCS or your soul and water that teaches you exactly how to do that at this point Troy tightens the wires by hand the purpose of the twist stick or twitch it's to tighten the wires and it will maintain the tension on the to erase posts that's exactly where I want this to me this is a perfect brace because when you go to push pull wires on I'm gonna pull you put six or eight wires on this right it's going to move a little if it's if it's straight the only way I can go is all fence builders should know that if you're gonna point a high tensile fence in it's okay to me you got to lean the post out of it now do you want to weigh out here like this no but you should it should never be left always gotta lean it so this brings us to the end of this film on setting posts and constructing end or corner braces we hope that the information will prove useful to you in your fencing endeavors

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