Ep2 Reinforcing A Portable Garage from Harbor Freight

Ep2 Reinforcing A Portable Garage from Harbor Freight


Welcome back kids! Today, we will be showing
you how we are going to be setting up the temporary shelter that we’ll be making where
we can spray, sand, and everything else that we need to fix the body of our car. My producer and cameraman, Bernoulli, got
me this portable garage from Harbor Freight. Good boy Bernoulli! [off-screen bark] The problem with the tents that Harbor Freight
offers is that they’re not strong enough to last the winters that Teddyland has here.
I mean, last year, we had so many teddie’s houses roofs collapse. And, I mean, that’s
a terrible way to die! So, what we’ll be showing you is how to reinforce this tent
so that it’s strong enough to last through the winters and the weather and everything
else that we may come across. It’s always a good idea to first count all
your parts to make sure you have everything. I’ve already done that, and now I’m gonna
put together the metal frame so that I can take measurements for my reinforcements. [music]
Mosquitoes! [music]
Now how am I gonna get these two tall pieces together?
… Eureka!
[music] Girl Power! This drinking is a lot like the steel tubes
used in the frame of this tent. It has a lot of compressive strength, which means you can
push on it really hard and it’ll be perfectly fine. It also has a lot of tensile strength,
which means you can pull on it. Now you’ll notice, when I try to push this
relay with this straw, it’ll do a perfectly good job. However, when I do this, it’ll
stay like that permanently, as will a steel tube, and it can’t push it at all. Walls made out of tubing like this will skew
or twist in high winds or other types of pressure. Now, if you’re inside when it skews or twists,
well, that’s a terrible way to die! Now let me ask you something, what would Chris
Hemsworth do to reinforce this? [Angelic Music] Chris Hemsworth would put in cross braces! Now you’ll notice, when the tent skews,
the distance between this point and this point gets longer. So if you put in a cross brace
with tensile strength, that’s not possible. You will also notice that if the tent tries
to twist, the distance between this point and this point gets shorter. So, if you have
a cross brace with compressive strength, it won’t happen. This is a wall with cross braces, and this
is a wall without. If I try to push this relay this way, it can’t, because it introduces
a skew. However, with this one, it can. Now if I try and push it this way, it can’t
either, because it introduces a twist. Now this wall, however once again, can. Now as
you can see, Chris Hemsworth would clearly choose the wall with cross braces. So we can
get rid of this one! The other problem that needs to be solved
with this tent is that this tent needs to last a year, and we have terrible winters
here in Teddyland. So I’m going to be creating a rigid roof to help support the snow. Our roof panels need to be 47 inches long. I’m going to be using 2 by 4’s for my
roof endbeams. My roof has a 22 and a half degree pitch, so I’m going to be ripping
the top edge of my two by fours to meet that angle. I’m gonna change the angle of my
blade to 22 and a half degrees first. Now I’m gonna change the height of my blade
so that it can reach through my two by four. Now I’m gonna set up my rip fence to the
right length. Now I’m ready to start ripping. Remember kids, safety first! I should be using
a blade guard because falling face-first into a spinning blade is a terrible way to die!
However, it often gets in the way when ripping, so I can’t right now. I am going to be using
my safety glasses and my ear plugs. Girl Power! I’m going to need 24 rafters, and I don’t
want them to be as heavy as normal two by fours, so I ripped them in half length-wise
so that now they are one-by-four nominal. I’ve cut all my pieces, including 60 noggins
out of one-by-two furring strips. Now I’m going to assemble my roof panels using first
my brad nailer to temporarily hold the pieces in place, and then next with screws to permanently
keep them there. These roof panels are very light weight so
that they’re easy to lift into place and so that they don’t add too much weight to
the structure of the tent. The rafters and noggins should give enough support for the
tent to withstand a heavy snow as long as I get out and rake the snow off the next day. I’m going to counter-sink all my screw holes
that way the screw heads don’t stick into my fabric. Hmm, perfect. This piece of furring strip
creates a lip where adjoining roof panels can be attached. For extra protection against abrading the
tent fabric, I’m covering all screw heads with duct tape. [Makes annoying squeaky noise] Now it’s time to assemble the ridge beam.
The ridge beam is basically a pocket over the ridge tube on the tent. It allows the
two sides of the roof panels to connect at the peak. During final assembly, a small collar
beam will bridge the two sides of the ridge beam at each rafter intersection. My tent needs a rigid floor so I can wheel
heavy equipment in it and jack up the car. So now I’m gonna move my sawhorses out of
the way so I can get to work on my floor. I’m elevating the floor off the ground with
two by threes. If I needed this floor to last more than about a year, I would use pressure
treated lumber. If I intended this to be a permanent shed, then I would put down gravel
first, and maybe some cemented corner posts. I’m using two layers of half inch OSB for
the floor. Pre-drilling holes makes the screws go in
much easier. Now I’m going to move my frame onto my floor
and start my final assembly. The front and back of the tent fabric goes
on first. The tent comes with 18-inch anchors that are
supposed to be twisted into the ground. Instead, I’m anchoring the tent to the floor. Given
the weight of the floor and the weight of the car that is going to be on it, it’ll
stay put with no trouble. The ridge beam assembles in three pieces,
and then the roof panels are tacked to the ridge beam to hold them in place. I notch the end beams to clear the tent tubing
and then put them in place. Now I can pull the main tent cover up and
over the roof panels with some rope that I’ve temporarily attached to the bottom rails of
the near side. These two by four studs will daughter the
tent posts to prevent them from buckling and to help carry the additional weight of the
roof panels and snow accumulation. I’m using scissor braces attached to the
rafters to ensure that the roof won’t cave in under the weight of snow and to increase
the tent’s resistance to winds that come from the side. I’m using furring strips to cross-brace
the walls. Diagonal braces against the base of each of
the wall studs increase the tent’s resistance to sideways wind loads. I’ve finished reinforcing my tent, and as
you can see, it’ll be able to handle one of Teddyland’s storms. Now the only thing
left is to clean up and extend the tarp about a foot and a half. That way, the floor won’t
get wet. And now, for the finishing touches… Chris Hemsworth! That was a lot of work, wasn’t it Bernoulli?
[off-screen bark] Now I don’t know about you, but I’m ready for some refreshments.
Here you go, Bernoulli. You dropped your hat, sir! As always, this show is filmed in front of
a live studio audience.

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