How to Build Reclaimed Wood Christmas Trees, 2 Different Ways

How to Build Reclaimed Wood Christmas Trees, 2 Different Ways


Hello again Remodelaholics! I’m Cassity,
and welcome back to our Remodelaholic channel. We share big and small DIY tutorials every
week, so please subscribe below so you don’t miss a thing. Today we’re talking CHRISTMAS
trees! As part of our Creative Christmas series this year, Krista built two different reclaimed
wood trees –a larger set for the porch, and a smaller set for a mantel or shelf. The
reclaimed wood gives them just the right rustic look, but, of course, you can use new lumber,
too. These turned out so cute, you’ll want to leave them out long past the holiday season.
So, let’s get building! Grab the printable plans for both styles of trees over at Remodelaholic.com
to consult as you build. For the porch- sized wooden Christmas trees, you’ll need two
or three 3 1/2-inch fence boards and two 2x4s. If you have scraps, you can build these for
FREE! Even you purchase all the lumber, it will still only cost between $15 and $20 depending
on your local lumber prices. So affordable! The herringbone style of these trees means
that each piece you cut will have one square end and one angled end. Using a miter saw,
make your cuts according to building plan over on our site. You can see that Krista
flipped the board to minimize waste so she didn’t end up with as many odd-sized scraps.
Next, make the tree stand by cutting the two 2x4s according to the cut dimensions in the
plans. The 2×4 pieces will give you both the tree bases and the two tree trunks, so you’ll
have two longer pieces and then eight 6-inch pieces. To assemble the base, attach one 6-inch
piece to an upright trunk, flush along the back and side, using nails. Next, nail another
6-inch piece against the upright, and repeat for the next 2 pieces so you’ve surrounded
the 2×4 trunk with a sturdy base. Start building the tree by attaching the triangular piece
to the upright, at the distance listed in the building plan. Add the small triangle
to the top, and then continue placing the other tree sections as detailed in the plans.
Isn’t this so easy, you guys? Repeat all of this for the second taller tree and, ta-da,
look at what you built! Krista took it one step further and dry brushed some green and
white paint on the trees. The dry brushing technique adds a little bit of color while
still maintaining all that weathered wood character. Don’t they look amazing? Now, let’s build another smaller style for
the mantel. These mini 3D tiered wood trees are perfect because they look like Christmas,
but they can stay out until the snow melts in the spring! To build this group of reclaimed
wood trees, you’ll need three 3 1/2 inch fence slats, one 2×2 and one 2×4. If you can
get your hands on some old fence wood like Krista did, your cost is practically free!
Buying the boards will only cost about $12, so this is still very affordable even if you
don’t have a pile of old lumber waiting for a project. You’ll also need a miter
saw. Krista designed these tiered trees to use cuts similar to crown molding, which is
what gives them such a great stacked 3D look. But don’t worry, she’s done the math for
you already! And don’t forget, the printable plans are available for free over at Remodelaholic.com.
To get started, adjust your saw to 45 degrees, and clamp a scrap piece of 1×2 on the bottom
of your miter saw, 2 ¼ inches from the fence. The bottom of your board will sit against
this clamped piece, allowing you to make a compound miter cut without having to readjust
your blade. Smart trick! For the top layer of the tree, make one 45 degree cut, then
flip the board and line up the blade with the previous cut, to give you a sharp point.
Then slide the board down ½ inch and cut the remaining mitered edge. Repeat 3 more
times so you have 4 triangle pieces. For the second layer of the wood tree, cut ½ inch
off the mitered edge remaining from the last step, then mark 2 ½ inches on the top of
the board. Adjust the board until the mark lines up with the blade, then clamp a piece
of scrap lumber to your bottom fence to set up a stop for all of the second layer pieces
and make the cutting quicker. Make your next cut, then flip the board, slide it over to
the stop, and cut your next piece. Repeat this until you have 4 pieces. For the third,
fourth, and fifth layers, follow the same process of measuring and clamping the stop
in place to cut 4 pieces each at 4 ½, 6 ½, and 8 ½ inches. If you want the tree larger,
keep going. Krista’s trees are 3, 4, and 5 tiers. Now it’s time to start assembling!
Glue the top layer together to form a pyramid, using thin beads of wood glue along each edge.
Repeat for each layer. After the glue has dried, place the bottom layer on your work
surface, and place the next layer on top. Nail the upper layer to the lower layer, and
repeat until all of the layers have been secured together for each tree. Almost done! Time
to create the wood tree trunks. Cut the 2×2 to 12, 18, and 24 inches for the upright part.
Then, for the base of the tree stand, cut 4 mitered 2×2 pieces to fit like a frame around
the upright. Assemble the tree base around the upright trunk, securing with nails to
the upright and to the adjacent piece. Next, add some color, if you want. Krista dry brushed
her trees with white acrylic paint, metallic green paint, and alternating layers of silver
metallic and gold metallic paint. Finish it up by placing each tree on top of
the assembled stand. The 2×2 upright trunk part will fit inside the top layer, so you
can affix the tree and the trunk together with 2-inch nails to hold the top layer onto
the upright. Now stand back and admire your work! Don’t you just LOVE how these turned
out? Which style will you build first? Leave Krista some love in the comments, click subscribe,
and watch these other great Christmas tutorials for an extra dose of holiday cheer. See you
again next week!

9 Replies to “How to Build Reclaimed Wood Christmas Trees, 2 Different Ways”

  1. Beautiful project! Please move your vehicle out of the Garage before starting work. Besides covering it in sawdust you donโ€™t know what else is gonna fly out the back of that saw. ๐Ÿ‘๐Ÿป

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