Pro Pack Mini: A Knockoff Wii Remote? | Things of Interest

Pro Pack Mini: A Knockoff Wii Remote? | Things of Interest


Hey there! So uh, before we begin this video, a lot of
you told me on Twitter that you guys actually didn’t really get a notification for my
latest core video that I uploaded last month, so in case you actually DID miss it: here
it is! You can check out the link up…on the card
up top or whatever. It’s about this little Famicom controller
called the Hyper Shot with only two buttons. I had a cool time learning a lot about it
and the games it supported. And in case you don’t wanna miss any more
videos, including this one, it’s all the more reason to click that little bell. I mean, you don’t HAVE to, but you know,
better be safe than sorry, right? Alright, roll it. Welcome back to another episode of Things
of Interest! And judging by your replies to my suggestion
to cover this on Twitter, this is a pretty darn interesting thing alright. This is the Pro Pack Mini, which it self-proclaims
as a ‘Wireless Motion Sensing Controller & Nunchuk Controller’. To be honest, I saw a ton of knockoff Wii
Remote accessories on sale during the Wii’s heyday, but I’ve hardly come across a knockoff
of the actual controller until now. And yeah, the colors on this thing certainly…stand
out. And people said the Wii U GamePad looked like
a Fisher-Price toy. This interesting design comes to us from BlazePro,
a company situated in where else but China. There’s a Chinese website link on the back
of the package, but it seems to be dead and just redirects to a Chinese lottery website now. Anyway, this is what it is, a cheap Wii Remote
and Nunchuk alternative with a smaller form factor. Well cheap is definitely a fitting term, I
picked this up for a grand total of about 13 US dollars, so that’s a decent price
for something that’s supposed to replicate all the features of a Wii Remote. It even claims to have Wii MotionPlus built
in like the newer Wii Remotes, so we’ll definitely be giving that a test drive later. On the back of the box is an exciting list
of features. “Mini remote 35% smaller than the original
Wii Remote!” “Contoured surfaces with soft-touch no-slip grip!” “Glowing main control buttons!” “Available in purple and black—” Wait hold on. I demand a refund. Okay, I looked it up, and turns out, there
is indeed a Pro Pack Mini controller with purple and black colors, but that one was
made by PowerA instead. In fact, this entire description appears to match
that product more than what I even have here. It mentions larger face buttons, but this
controller’s buttons aren’t any larger than those on a Wii Remote, but the PowerA
controller definitely has larger buttons. Di…did BlazePro just…steal their product description? Is this Pro Pack Mini a knockoff of another
Pro Pack Mini? Are they allowed to do that, like legally? Something tells me this ain’t gonna be a quality product. Well, let’s get this over with. The first thing I noticed is that it doesn’t
come with a wrist strap of any kind, which was advertised on the STOLEN product description,
so we’re just off to a fantastic start. Now, appearance aside, there’s nothing really
wrong with how this controller feels on the hands. Every button feels solid like you’d expect. You got the clicky Start, Select and Home
buttons in the middle, and the D-Pad is a bit stiff but it doesn’t feel like one cheap
single piece, you can still rock it around, which is nice. Also, on the right side of the remote, [SAKURAI’S TRANSLATOR]
“it has a nice curved form to it.” Other than that, it’s got basically everything
a normal Wii Remote has. The sensor on top, LED lights, accessory port,
the same battery compartment and sync button, and it even has the speakers. Time will tell if any of these function as
they should. As for the Nunchuk, it feels about the same, but that change to cheap plastic
on the analog stick really shows. It’s like an ASMR video over here. [Nunchuk makes considerably more clicking noises
than a regular Nunchuk would] Well, let’s pop in those two double A batteries. Fortunately, it didn’t explode, but geez,
those LED lights are blinding. Could’ve taken some of that brightness and
gave your controller glowing buttons so your product is AS ADVERTISED. Let’s just get on with it and see how this
thing stacks up against the regular Wii Remote when you’re actually using it. For starters, it connects to my Wii U just fine, and most of the buttons appear to work as they should. The IR pointer also works as well, though
I don’t know if it’s just me or if it’s just a tad bit more sensitive than the regular
Wii Remote. This is also the part where I can confirm
that the speakers do function, as well as the rumble feature! They did indeed cram all the features a regular
Wii Remote Plus would have in here. The quality of said features have yet to be
fully tested but I applaud the effort. To begin with, why not test its motion sensing
capabilities by beginning with a classic round of Wii Sports tennis? (why can’t this just the ported to the Switch) Well, the accelerometer works fine, I can
swing my racket around no problem. Moving on to one of my favorite motion control
games, WarioWare Smooth Moves, it functions fine as well, with the exception of…a lack
of a wrist strap. Overall, looks like the Pro Pack Mini has
basic motion control down pat, but what about that added MotionPlus feature? Thankfully, at least BlazePro was true to
their word on this aspect, the MotionPlus feature does get detected by games like Wii
Sports Resort. And…yeah, it works as it should! I’m actually impressed by this one, they
got the motion controls on this controller down pretty well. But waggling is one thing, mashing is another. So let’s see how those buttons fare in a
more traditional platformer like New Super Mario Bros. Wii,
using the horizontal position. And right off the bat in the first level,
I could tell something was wrong. The 2 button is…not really responsive. It’s doing the thing where you have to like press
it down and exert even more force to actually register the button press. Which is not ideal when you have to jump at
precise moments like in a Mario game. I have no idea if this is just a manufacturing
flaw specific to my unit, but this is definitely not a good look. The D-Pad functions well, which is high praise
for an unlicensed controller, but the completely flat button shape just rubs me the wrong way. Considering the aesthetics of the controller,
you could’ve made the button actually curve more than just at the edges. So yeah, it’s definitely no match for the
original, but pretty much every button is of passable quality except for the 2 button, which is
basically a death sentence in 2D platformers. At the very least you can still attach your
own Classic Controllers and use it on things like Virtual Console. Lastly, let’s check out that Mini Nunchuk
by firing up Super Mario Galaxy. Now, the obnoxious noises from the
cheap plastic analog stick aside, it appears to work fine as well… …at first glance. You see, I found this weird quirk in how this
analog stick registers smaller movements. If I gently move the stick up, it actually
goes up quite a bit before Mario actually starts tiptoeing. But if I just slightly nudge it downwards, boom, Mario just takes off. This inconsistent control just completely
destroys any of my attempts to carefully navigate around tight platforms, which is like half
the point of an analog stick. This Nunchuk is, sadly, not a winner. Overall, the Pro Pack Mini, or should I say
the knockoff of the real Pro Pack Mini, had a lot of potential to be a
good, cheap Wii Remote alternative. It has all of the features of a standard Wii
Remote Plus at less than half the cost, even including a Nunchuk. Heck, the smaller size didn’t feel cramped
at all and I definitely appreciate it. But sadly, the cheap price came at the cost
of reliability. It isn’t literally unplayable, but the fact
that not every button or even the analog stick work properly just doesn’t make it an ideal
replacement. In a way, this really encapsulates the feeling
of the cheap, third-party ‘little brother controller”. And even if you’re on a budget, with how
much the Wii sold during its lifetime, used Wii Remotes are plenty and still super cheap, sometimes even cheaper than the
amount I paid for this Pro Pack Mini. So in the end, this is just a novel little
case study on what you get if you try to cut back the production costs of a Wii Remote
and Nunchuk. You still get all the features, but it doesn’t
have that goold ol’ Nintendo seal of quality and it shows. I admire the effort that was put in to shrink it, but there are definitely a lot better solutions out there
if you’re looking for a cheap Wii Remote. Though I will say, it’s kinda funny seeing the
mini Nunchuk still have that little connector hook on the plug that you’re supposed to
slide the non-existent wrist strap through. D…did I ever do that? I don’t think anyone ever actually bothered
to do that. Anyway, don’t lie to your customers, kids.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *